History02HIstory03History04

History

The New York Hotel (listed on the National Register of Historic Places) was originally constructed as one of Salt Lake’s finest luxury hostelries by local mining magnate and businessman Orange J. Salisbury. Salisbury was a Cornell-educated mining engineer who obtained several patents and organized the Kelly Filter Press Company.

This 75-room hotel was built in 1906. It was designed by R. K. A. Kletting, a prominent architect known for the State Capitol, Old Saltair, and many other importatant structures of the period. The hotel deteriorated and was finally condemned by the city. It underwent extensive remodeling in the mid 1970s, and it is now home to the Market Street Grill, Market Street Oyster Bar, and the New Yorker restaurant.

Mr. Williams engaged Muir & Chong Architects and builder William Perry to assist him in rehabilitating the building for restaurants and offices. Mr. Williams, with partner Tom Seig, opened the New Yorker Restaurant in 1978. With the help of partner Tom Guinney, the Market Street Grill opened in 1980 and the Market Street Oyster Bar opened in 1981. Under Gastonomy’s stewardship since 1976, the building now stands as a symbol of successful restoration and adaptive use of a significant historic building—and major catalyst for the revival and vigor of the southwest downtown district of which it is the centerpiece.